I Changed the Background On My Blog. Why Did I Do It?

I write horror fiction, that’s why. And if you want to get a better idea of how scary some of the stuff I write is, all you have to do is look at the background on my blog page. The same background appears on my Twitter page here.

Some folks have said the stories I write is scarier than anything Stephen King or H.P. Lovecraft have come up with. If I had to recommend the scariest ones to read, it would be “Last Stop” in  “Deadly Duo: Two Stories of Death and Murder” and “The Culling of the Damned” in “Ghostly Quintet: Five Tales of Ghosts, Apparitions, and the Beyond.” And those are just for starters.

Just in case you don’t know, here are the horror books I have written thus far:

Evil Creeps In: A Tale of Exorcism

“Evil Creeps In: A Tale of Exorcism” is currently available in paperback at Amazon.com, and at Amazon.com and as a Kindle file.

When a woman comes to a Roman Catholic Church seeking help for her mother, two lifelong friends, one a Lutheran layman, and the other a Catholic priest, find their friendly discussions turning to the more serious topics of evil, demonic possession and exorcism.

Over a period of weeks, the priest observes an exorcism, and he tells his friend some of what he sees, but can the two friends exorcise their own personal demons in the meantime?

At over 56,000 words in length, Thomas D. Taylor’s “Evil Creeps In: A Tale of Exorcism” gives the reader a lot to think about, and maybe even a scare or two into the bargain!

Deadly Duo: Two Stories of Death and Murder

“Deadly Duo: Two Stories of Death and Murder” is currently available in paperback at Amazon.com, and at Amazon.com and as a Kindle file.
 
Thomas D. Taylor does it again with two stories meant to chill you to the bones.
 
When John Hill is poisoned by his wife, he sees reanimated corpses building a railroad through the No Man’s Land behind his house. His counselor tells him he’s only hallucinating, and that his visions aren’t real. Just when he begins to believe her, Hill finds himself in the clutches of the malevolent beings. Unless he can escape from them, and from the depths of a macabre subway that runs beneath Chicagoland, it will be the “Last Stop” for him.
 
How Stanley Yablonowitz Committed Suicide” is the story of how a man came to his demise at the hands of his own psychopathic children while his helpless wife looked on. How did it happen? Who witnessed the event? And why didn’t anyone call the police?
 
Read this book and you will never see the real world the same way again, even in daylight.
 
76,000 words.

Gruesome Triad: Three Stories of the Macabre

“Gruesome Triad: Three Stories of the Macabre” is currently available in paperback at Amazon.com, and at Amazon.com and as a Kindle file.

“The Plague”

How do we go from two plague survivors playing an innocent game of “Go Fish” at the beginning of the evening to a roasting pan full of human blood the next morning?

“Matters of Faith”

What evil and unholy secret is Faith Breatnach McCollister keeping in the locked room in her cabin on Manitou Lake?

“The Sand Phantom”

When a quicksand pit in the tall saw grass of Vietnam swallows a combat helicopter and the men within it, what horrors are to be found when an attempt is made to find the bodies?

The stories inside this anthology will curdle anyone’s blood. But even more disturbing, as much as these are tales of morality as well as a horror stories, there may be no redemption for any of the characters involved no matter how nice and morally driven some of them seem.

At over 51,000 words, “Gruesome Triad: Three Stories of the Macabre”  gives you plenty of reasons to make sure the night light is on before you go to bed.

Grim Quatrain: Four Tales of Terror

“Grim Quatrain: Four Tales of Terror” is currently available in paperback at Amazon.com, and at Amazon.com and as a Kindle file.
 

“From Beneath”

What causes horrific creatures to crawl up from the depths of the earth to feast upon mankind? A particularly apt tale considering that it has been published in 2012.

“The April Fool”

See what happens when an April Fool’s Day joke turns deadly.

“The Mailman”

For thirteen years, The Mailman delivered torture and death to David Senior. Now he’s getting ready to deliver even worse to David Junior. What can be done to protect young David from The Mailman?

“The Ragtime Blues”

What haunts Jacob Wells? And is it good, or evil?

Read these stories and you will never think of the earth, the sea, Halloween, and even the mail the same way again. 

From creepy-crawlies, twists of fate, demons, and even a ghost, Taylor delivers to true horror fans.

At over 57,500 words, “

Grim Quatrain: Four Tales of Terror”  gives you plenty of reasons to make sure the closet light is on before you go to bed.

Ghostly Quintet: Five Tales of Ghosts, Apparitions, and the Beyond

“Ghostly Quintet: Five Tales of Ghosts, Apparitions, and the Beyond” is currently available in paperback at Amazon.com, and at Amazon.com and as a Kindle file.

Ghostly Quintet

From Thomas D. Taylor, the author of “Evil Creeps In: A Tale of Exorcism” comes a terrifying anthology of horror stories that will leave you speechless.

The five stories included in this compilation will take you on a hellish journey that begins in the Bermuda Triangle and ends in the lair of little green men.

Along the way, you will stroll through crumbling, haunted graveyards, visit the depraved minds of lunatics, and creep down a twisting flight of steps into a horrible, frightening abyss.

There is something here for everyone. Ghosts, demons, madness, and conspiracy theories await you. But the real journey is from the dark minds of the characters to the blackness of their human hearts.

115,000 words.

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s